Pharmacy Maximenu


 

               Medicinal Tubers

                     Carrot

Daucus carota L.Apiaceae, Cultivated carrot, Queen-Anne's lace (Wild)

Folk Medicine

Seeds are aromatic, carminative, diuretic, emmenagogue, and stimulant, and are used for dropsy, chronic dysentery, kidney ailments, and worms. Also as an aphrodisiac, a nervine tonic, and for uterine pain. Roots are refrigerant and are used in infusion for threadworm. Diuretic, and eliminating uric acid, carrots belong in the diet of gout-prone people.

Local stimulant for indolent ulcers; other ingredients of carrot lower blood sugar; hence carrot might be increased to good advantage in the prevention of cancer, diabetes, dyspepsia, and gout, possibly heart disease. Elsewhere the root, prepared in various manners, is used for tumors, cancerous ulcers, cancerous wounds, tumors of the testicles, mammary carcinoma, and skin cancer.

The juice of the root is applied to carcinomatous ulcers of the neck and uterus, cancer of the bowels and stomach cancer. Scraped roots are used to stimulate indolent ulcers. Cancer-fearers may be reinforced by the knowledge that carrots are relatively high in fiber, retinoid like substances, and the seeds also contain the rather ubiquitous ß-sitosterol, which has shown activity in Ca, LL, and WA tumor systems.

Having heard from three different sources that wild carrot seed were used as a morning-after contraceptive in Pennsylvania, I was particularly interested to read that, "At doses of 80 and 120 mg/mouse, the seed extract, if given orally from day 4 to 6 post-coitum, effectively inhibits implantation." Experimentally hypoglycemic, a tea made from Queen Anne's Lace was believed to help maintain low blood sugar levels in humans, but it had no effect on diabetes artifically induced in animals.

Wild carrot tea has been recommended for bladder and kidney ailment, dropsy, gout, gravel; seeds are recommended for calculus, obstructions of the viscera, dropsy, jaundice, scurvy.